Sugartree Creek Restoration Project

The Compact received a grant through the Frist Foundation to pilot a water quality improvement program in Nashville. Due to its high population density, impaired water quality and public support, Sugartree Creek in the Green Hills area of Nashville was the optimum starting point for us.

Sugartree Creek is an urban stream running through the heart of Nashville’s Green Hills neighborhood.  It is considered polluted by federal standards with two primary culprits – high nutrient levels and habitat loss due to man made alteration. There is no one quick solution to these problems making stream remediation a challenge.

The Cumberland River Compact and its partners, Metro Water Services and the Nature Conservancy, Tennessee Chapter are working in Sugartree Creek to establish a model for urban stream mediation. The goal of our project is to implement newly designed EPA software that determines optimum locations for water quality projects and apply this to Sugartree Creek. Using this software we have essentially determined what actions need to be performed where and if this is adhered to we will reduce nutrient and pathogen levels back to a healthy level and reduce impervious surface in critical areas.

Sugartree_Map

Rain Garden Project with MBA

Rain Garden Project with MBA

We had a great morning working with MBA on Saturday October 8th. We installed the first of two rain gardens that they will partner with us to plant this October. This particular rain garden was roughly 250 sq feet and will capture and...

Eutrophication in Streams

Eutrophication in Streams

Eutrophication in Streams Like many urban streams in the United States, Sugartree Creek suffers from high nutrient levels, specifically, Nitrogen and Phosphorous. In Green Hills, these nutrients can be directly traced back to stormwater runoff that travels across...

Rain Garden Oppurtunity for Landowners

The Cumberland River Compact offers Davidson County residents rain garden consultations (where we conduct on-site visits to verify your properties ability to function as a rain garden) and native plants to propagate the garden. For more information on rain gardens...

Dog Waste a Contaminant to Local Water Sources

Dog Waste a Contaminant to Local Water Sources

Did you know that our own beloved dogs are responsible for the majority of E. Coli pathogens present in our water sources. Scooping, bagging (in a biodegradable bag of course) and placing it in the garbage is a much better alternative. Or if you aren't too grossed...